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Sunday, July 8, 2018

Another interesting article: pedestrian deaths are not as simple as 'drunk walking'

Nashville Pedestrian Death Registry is working to detail all pedestrian deaths in our city.  How, why, where, when do these events occur and under what conditions. Prior to initiating this project in 2017, it did feel that most assumed that alcohol or drugs were involved and there is definitely some who fall into this unfortunate category.  If we make this assumption, people seem to shrug their shoulders and put it into the bucket of 'not much can be done' - people will be intoxicated and they will make mistakes.    The article below, which has been edited, highlights were the pitfalls are when we don't dig deeper and we just assume that this is an inevitable event due to poor choices. 






To Read, Please Click on LINK:  No, 'Drunk Walking' is not causing the rise in pedestrian deaths








Edited article:


The Detroit Free Press reported on one reason America's pedestrians are dying at a higher rate: the growing number of bigger, more dangerous vehicles. It seemed like coverage of pedestrian safety might turn a corner and get over the impulse to blame the victim.


It didn’t last. A new report from PBS News Hour reported, “Pedestrian deaths are up nationwide, fueled by people who walk while drunk.” (which is produced by the Pew Charitable Trusts).
Except that’s not what the evidence says.


PBS's Bergal’s whole case rests on the fact that about 2,000 people who were struck and killed while walking last year had a blood alcohol level in excess of the legal limit — an increase of 300 since 2014.  


The data actually shows that drunk victims are a smaller share of total pedestrian fatalities today than they were in 2014.  Since 2014, pedestrian fatalities have increased 22 percent, according to the Governors Highway Safety Association. The stats reported by PBS News Hour work out to a smaller 18 percent increase in the same period, meaning drunk victims are a smaller share of all pedestrian victims today than in 2014.


In other words, the increase in pedestrian fatalities is clearly not “fueled by people who walk while drunk.”


Bergal reported:
In Austin, where a dozen drunken walkers died in 2016 and seven died in 2017, many crashes were on a stretch of Interstate 35, an eight-lane, high-speed highway divided by a concrete barrier, said police Detective Pat Oborski. The highway is lined with fast-food restaurants on one side and low-cost motels on the other.

Drunken pedestrians cross the highway, going back and forth between the motels and restaurants located on frontage roads, Oborski says. While there’s a bridge over the highway about a quarter of a mile away, some people figure it’s easier to run across than to walk to the bridge.
Without realizing it, Bergal is describing one of the great threats to pedestrians: Dangerous, high-speed arterial roads without safe crossings. These conditions put people on foot at the greatest risk.


Stories like this cause real harm. They give officials in cities like Austin cover not to do anything but blame the victims. They perpetuate the marginalization of people with no choice but to walk on dangerous streets, who are more likely to be poor, black, or brown.


The more press coverage of pedestrians fatalities blames victims, the less pressure there is to rethink the eight-lane speedways and dangerous SUV designs that jeopardize people’s lives.

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Wednesday, July 4, 2018

'Pedestrians are 2-3 x more likely to suffer a fatality when struck by an SUV or pickup truck than when struck by a passenger car'

Interesting read...most buy SUVs for the look, space and the safety (their own).  'SUVs, with their higher front-end profile, are at least twice as likely as cars to kill the walkers, joggers and children they hit'.  This is a new angle to consider - how these vehicles effect the safety of others particularly those on foot.


As someone highly interested in tracking these deaths, see https://www.nashvillepedestriandeathregistry.org/, the type of vehicle driven should be listed in the data collected on each pedestrian death.




TO READ ARTICLE, CLICK ON LINK:  https://www.freep.com/story/money/cars/2018/06/28/suvs-killing-americas-pedestrians/646139002/




This picture says it all.  Everything is geared to the person IN THE CAR and NOT someone on foot.  The width of the road, the height of the signage.  This is NOT a safe or healthy place for a pedestrian.






Death on foot: America's love of SUVs is killing pedestrians America's love for SUVs is killing pedestrians, and federal safety regulators have known for years.

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety calculated an 81 percent increase in single-vehicle pedestrian fatalities involving SUVs in 2009-16. The Free Press/USA TODAY analysis of the same federal data, counting vehicles that struck and killed pedestrians rather than the number of people killed, showed a 69 percent increase in SUV involvement.


'Pedestrians are 2-3 x more likely to suffer a fatality when struck by an SUV or pickup truck than when struck by a passenger car'




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Tuesday, July 3, 2018

Idle-Free City?

The heat and exhaust from cars can be overwhelming for pedestrians - especially at this time of year.

Just a reminder and something to consider







Monday, July 2, 2018

Walking District Pace Car Bumper Stickers Available!

Walking District Pace Car Bumper Stickers
are available!


3 neighborhoods have active Walking Districts - West End/Hillsboro, Cleveland Park (East) and Una
(Antioch).  Speed limits are reduced to 20 mph on neighborhood streets and 25mph on collectors roads.



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The concept of a Walking Districts is pretty straightforward.  Designed for local streets that are highly walked but have a low Sidewalk Priority Index (SPI) score.  With our current system of using the SPI, these areas would be last on the list of sidewalk creation.  And, maybe rightfully so.  The areas I am talking about are low volume in vehicular traffic neighborhoods and many have a park-like feel.  

The concept entails 3 things making it a quick, easy, and inexpensive fix.  The first is signage:  a sign announcing that you are entering a Walking District.  The second is a street decal (think of the bicycle decal you see on roadways but change it to a pedestrian).  The third is a speed limit reduction to 20mph.

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Sunday, July 1, 2018

John Zimmer from Lyft: 'We don't need as many roads and parking lots'

NPR - How I Built This -Lyft - John-Zimmer


I agree with John Zimmer.  'Until we've accomplished the fact that you don't need to own a car in a city, until we've accomplished the fact that we don't need as many roads and parking lots in our cities, until we allow for our cities to be, you know, redesigned around the people living in them instead of the cars that are parked in them, then we're not happy'.




We want cites that are built for the PEOPLE and not just cars & their parking...  









Not this...









THIS!



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Saturday, June 30, 2018

The Sidewalk Foundation is pleased to announce four $500 micro-grants to be paid to those who build their own sidewalk in Nashville!

The Sidewalk Foundation is pleased to announce four $500 micro-grants to be paid to those who build their own sidewalk in Nashville!






The Sidewalk Foundation of Nashville is very thankful to have recently received two $1000 donations!  Thank you to those who are putting a donation behind the belief that it is our right to walk comfortably and safely in this city. 


We are turning these donations directly around and are offering four $500 micro-grants to those who put in their own piece of sidewalk per Nashville's Public Works standards.






Two of these grants are being offered to those who live on Bowling Av as this is my sidewalk project # 1!  Bowling Av is getting a sidewalk extension from West End to Forest Park but, the remainder, to Woodmont, is not in the plan.  The first two homeowners who puts in their piece on Bowling will be awarded $500 from The Sidewalk Foundation.  The additional two grants will be opened up to anyone of Nashville who does the same. 





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I want to remind Nashville that we have a long history of neighbors pitching in to complete wanted projects.  Woodmont Blvd was the first paved road in Nashville AND it was funded by those who lived in the neighborhood (in 1914!!!). 





Most likely understand, as disappointing as this is, that our city cannot fund all needed sidewalks in a timely way.  The estimate to completion date for Nashville's sidewalk network, at our current pace, is 1000 years from now.  If we truly want walkability, we will all need to help.  


To make a donation: 


Please contact us if interested in a $500 grant for sidewalk production per Public Works standards: 

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Friday, June 29, 2018

3 Easy Ways to Support NEW SIDEWALKS in NASHVILLE!

Shade Parade Nashville and The Sidewalk Foundation of Nashville are working hand in hand to raise money for NEW SIDEWALKS.  At this time, we have two $500 micro-grants available for those who put in their own piece. 

We'd like to do more!


You can help by:







Coming soon:  Native TN Echinacea plants!  This fall, I will be selling these beauties to raise more money for NEW SIDEWALKS.   





The details of how a loved one passed while biking or as a pedestrian is telling.  As reported by NPR this week, about half of these cases are not even reported


'I looked for any details, any scraps of acknowledgment from the world, about my brother’s existence and passing. It was not headline news in LA; I don’t think it made it into the LA Times or onto the evening news'.




To read, please click on LINK:
https://usa.streetsblog.org/2018/06/25/please-try-to-look-squarely-at-the-crisis-of-traffic-fatalities/


Kirsten Brewer and her brother Tom. Photo: Kirsten Brewer
Kirsten Brewer and her brother Tom. Photo: Kirsten Brewer




About 40,000 Americans lost their lives in traffic crashes last year. Traffic violence is a public health crisis. But we rarely hear from the people who lose loved ones, who mostly suffer in silence. We invited readers to share their experiences of coping with devastating loss caused by traffic collisions. Kirsten Brewer responded with this essay.


In 2016 my brother Tom was biking home in Los Angeles. He took a street that I would learn is quiet for LA, but statistically deadly for bicyclists and pedestrians. At about 6 p.m. on this particular Saturday, a drunk driver in a box truck careened down a side street, hitting parked cars before killing my brother at an intersection. He was 26.


That first night after I got the call I was shocked and frightened. My brother was already dead, yet I was scared of what was to come. We had few details that first night, and my recollection is fuzzy. Trauma affects your memory.


We weren’t quite sure that it was a drunk driver. We didn’t know it was a truck. We didn’t know where exactly my brother was in LA. 


It was late in the East and there was nothing I could do. I tried to sleep; I could not at first. The fear felt like I was on the edge of a tremendous pit. It was inevitable that I would fall into this pit. I worried that my brother had suffered. I worried that the crash had been gruesome. Most of all I feared what would follow when that pit of grief sucked me in. I had no idea what was to come for me or my family. 


Over the following weeks I went through the rituals of unexpected death. I called friends and family to inform them; then I texted and emailed others because the conversation became unbearable.
I looked for any details, any scraps of acknowledgment from the world, about my brother’s existence and passing. It was not headline news in LA; I don’t think it made it into the LA Times or onto the evening news. My small, hometown newspaper back East did a cover story. They interviewed my dad and photographed him in his apartment in front of a wall of photos and my brother’s artwork. 

Wednesday, June 27, 2018

Nashville Pedestrian Death Registry Sparks Research & Discussion

Incredibly proud that this work is being used for further research and to spark discussion.   We need this. 


Nashville Pedestrian Death Registry.org was created spring 2017 as a joint project to further investigation of how people die while walking in our city.  As with most things, the more you learn about the subject, the more complicated and interesting it becomes... 


Anthony and I both knew that the stories were more detailed compared to what we read in news and police reports.  The map of pedestrian deaths is also very different from what we were hearing as assumed trouble spots.


Favorite quotes from article from NPR below:
  • 45 percent of pedestrian fatalities go unreported in local news outlets, and that when they do, the details provided by police and journalists may be contributing to misperceptions about why pedestrians die.
  • Last year was the deadliest on record for the city, with 23 killed
  • Initial traffic crash reports don’t seek many details about victims on foot — often only whether the person was in a crosswalk or wearing dark clothing.  Those limited details, without more context, could lead to “victim blaming”
  • The researchers examined news articles, finding them “jarringly” formulaic, often completely composed of the routine facts that are included in federal crash reporting forms. That can leave out details about the victim, and context about the quality of sidewalks and crosswalks, street lighting, other infrastructure and road conditions.
  • “Media plays a big part in how we have public perceptions about public safety issues,” Robinson said, adding, “there’s very little coverage of infrastructure at all.”
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To Read or Listen to this article, click the LINK:  http://nashvillepublicradio.org/post/tsu-researchers-pedestrian-deaths-are-misunderstood-part-because-police-and-journalists#stream/0



Credit Tony Gonzalez / WPLN


TSU Researchers: Pedestrian Deaths Are Misunderstood, In Part Because Of Police And Journalists 
  
6/27/2018

Researchers at Tennessee State University say they’ve found shortcomings in how pedestrian deaths are documented and reported through local news outlets.


In a study presented Tuesday (PDF), the pair of researchers said they found that roughly 45 percent of pedestrian fatalities go unreported in local news outlets, and that when they do, the details provided by police and journalists may be contributing to misperceptions about why pedestrians die.

Anthony Campbell, assistant professor of public administration, said he decided to investigate walking deaths because he’d picked up on some misunderstandings while compiling stories of local victims for the Nashville Pedestrian Death Registry.

Last year was the deadliest on record for the city, with 23 killed.

Anecdotally, people didn’t understand where these were happening, or why.

“People tend to say, ‘Oh, well, down on Broadway or something? People get drunk, come here …’ ” he said. “And that’s not. None happen there. Mainly because cars aren’t going fast enough. And then when you look where we found deaths are occurring are out at the perimeter, where people are having to walk home or go from point A to point B and there isn’t a sidewalk.”

Stats provided last year by Walk Bike Nashville show the most deaths (12) occurred on Old Hickory Boulevard, followed by Gallatin and Main Street in East Nashville (11), Murfreesboro Pike (11) and Nolensville Pike (8). 





To read the remainder of the article, please click on link above


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If you know someone who has perished on foot in Nashville, please contact us.  We would like to talk to you.



Tuesday, June 26, 2018

Want More Sidewalks in Nashville AND Need A Gift - easy way to do both!


Want More Sidewalks in Nashville AND Need A Gift - easy way to do both!

LINK: 










Want more sidewalks in Nashville AND need a gift?  Half of your purchase with Boon Supply Company will go to supporting NEW sidewalk production in Nashville.  Currently, I am proud to say that The Sidewalk Foundation has two $500 grants available for homeowners who build their own piece of new sidewalk.  Your purchase can help us give out more! 






For direct donation --- http://thesidewalkfoundation.org/


#NashvilleNeedsSidewalks 
#FoundOnFoot 
#DontLetNashvilleBuildersTalkYouOutOfPuttingInSidewalks


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Monday, June 25, 2018

'You Have To Start Somewhere' - Appreciative of Each and Every Piece of Sidewalk in Nashville!

'You Have To Start Somewhere' - Appreciative of Each and Every Piece of Sidewalk in Nashville!


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Lately, I have been LOVING the sight of 'sidewalks to nowhere'.  Little pieces are popping up thanks to The Sidewalk Bill 493 which went into effect about one year ago thanks to Councilperson Angie Henderson's hard work and commitment. 


I'm glad, too, that there has been a bit of media interest on the topic.  A few favorite quotes from a recent piece on WKRN news by Nick Caloway:
  • Nora Kern, executive director of Walk Bike Nashville, hopes that as the city continues to grow eventually those sidewalks will connect. "I'm really excited when I see sidewalks being built where they never had before," Kern said. "You have to start somewhere."
  • Councilwoman Henderson, who represents Metro Council District 34 in the Green Hills area, said this legislation should have been passed a half-century ago. But, she insists, better late than never.















please click on link to read the story and watch the video:  https://www.wkrn.com/news/local-news/nashville-has-more-sidewalks-a-year-after-builders-face-fees/1247806971


Nashville has more sidewalks now, but some go nowhere
By:   Nick Caloway


Posted: Jun 18, 2018 10:46 PM CDT
Updated: Jun 18, 2018 10:52 PM CDT

It's been nearly a year since a rule encouraging developers to build sidewalks went into effect in Nashville.
The ordinance, sponsored by Councilwoman Angie Henderson, was approved last April and took effect last July.
The measure forces builders of new homes in certain areas to either build sidewalks out front or pay a fee in lieu of the sidewalk construction.


"So if you have an immediate abutting sidewalk right next to you, we encourage you to build," said Henderson. "But if you do not, and it would be a disconnected segment, you can choose to pay the fee in lieu of construction. It's the builder's choice."
It was an effort to improve walkability in Nashville, which lacks sidewalks along roughly half of the city's roads.
Some builders choose to pay the fee, while others build so-called "sidewalks to nowhere," which end at the property line and do not connect to other walkways.


Nora Kern, executive director of Walk Bike Nashville, hopes that as the city continues to grow eventually those sidewalks will connect. "I'm really excited when I see sidewalks being built where they never had before," Kern said. "You have to start somewhere."
Councilwoman Henderson, who represents Metro Council District 34 in the Green Hills area, said this legislation should have been passed a half-century ago. But, she insists, better late than never.


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Shade Parade Nashville is a collection of documents dedicated to fostering a conversation around walkability issues in our city.

If you are interested, please follow, comment or share

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Sunday, June 24, 2018

Dying While Walking: Interrogating Media Coverage of Pedestrian Deaths in the United States - this TUESDAY!!!



I'm so excited to help spread the word that on Tuesday, June 26th, 2018, Anthony Campbell is giving an important talk about how pedestrian deaths are reported in the media. 






https://www.eventbrite.com/e/dying-while-walking-interrogating-media-coverage-of-pedestrian-deaths-in-the-united-states-tickets-46860192096 


This has been a hot topic in the pedestrian advocacy world as so often the factual details of what occurred are reduced to 1) was the pedestrian in a crosswalk,  2) was the pedestrian wearing dark clothing and 3) was alcohol or drugs involved.  He and I both felt strongly there must be a deeper story with these deaths, more complex, and leaning heavily on how people actually live crossed with infrastructure and policy.  With this in mind, we started Nashville Pedestrian Death Registry to track these deaths in Nashville.  







Now, Anthony, along with Cara Robinson,  have developed a talk entitled Dying While Walking: Interrogating Media Coverage of Pedestrian Deaths in the United States.  Anthony is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Public Administration at Tennessee State University, a good friend and my partner at Nashville Pedestrian Death Registry.org. His research focuses on the lived experience of citizen-government relationships and the qualitative dimensions of how humans interact with the built environment. As an avid cyclist, Anthony has first-hand exposure to the importance of a safe transportation infrastructure. 


I'm so pleased and proud of the work he is accomplishing and hope you will make time for this interesting talk. 


Date and Time






Description
Join us for the presentation, Dying While Walking: Interrogating Media Coverage of Pedestrian Deaths in the United States by Anthony Campbell, PhD and Cara Robinson, PhD of Tennessee State University's College of Public Service (description below).

Bring your own lunch and meet us at the Avon Williams campus of Tennessee State University campus in Training Room #2 from noon to 1pm. See you there!

In recent years, a wide array of policy and technological innovations have been introduced in order to lower individuals’ risk of dying while driving. At the same time, there has been an increased risk of dying while walking. According to the Governor’s Highway Safety Association (GHSA), the number of pedestrians killed in the U.S. had the biggest ever single-year increase in 2016 – 5,997 (an 11% increase from 2015). Moreover, there was a nearly 25% increase in the 5-year span from 2012 to 2016. This increase in pedestrian deaths has resulted in public and nonprofit organizations developing strategies to improve pedestrian safety. One of those strategies has been the widespread deployment of educational campaigns to raise awareness about pedestrian deaths and ways to enhance safety. Juxtaposed to these campaigns has been the media’s coverage of pedestrian deaths, which are largely a product of police reports. Given the theoretical models related to the media’s disproportionate impact on public opinions, as well as the media’s and public’s impact on public policy decisions, it is necessary to interrogate how the media impacts the portrayal of pedestrian deaths in the United States. Utilizing media content analysis, and drawing upon media reports (from 2012 to 2016) in five large U.S. cities and one county, this research helps illuminate the role the media plays in constructing the narratives surrounding pedestrian deaths, and ultimately pedestrian safety. These narratives impact urban design and public policy decision-making related to pedestrian infrastructure and public safety. The media’s coverage of pedestrian deaths deserves interrogation, because as Malcom X powerfully avers, “The media's the most powerful entity on earth. They have the power to make the innocent guilty and to make the guilty innocent, and that's power.


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Saturday, June 16, 2018

NASHVILLE'S Board of Zoning Appeals - Sidewalk Variances, Outcomes, FOR YOUR REVIEW - is your neighborhood missing out?


Why does Nashville have so few sidewalks compared to sister cities with a similar population?  We have wide support for sidewalks both politically and on the citizen level.  We have local issues that argue strongly for need:  a high rate of pedestrian fatalities, traffic, an elevated burden of obesity, a large city/county design encompassing 532 sq miles, lack of access/consistency and our fair share of poor air quality days. 

A fixable issue we face in sidewalk production is the numerous variances requested each and every month through the Board of Zoning.  These requests are literally robbing neighborhoods of sidewalks legally promised through Sidewalk Bill 493.  If you want sidewalks -> this is a place for YOU to act. 


What you NEED TO KNOW is that once a piece of sidewalk goes on your block face, the In-Lieu fee is no longer applicable.  The next sidewalk has to go in.  The city also prioritizes 'gaps' and - et viola - you have your sidewalk.   




In an attempt to make these sidewalk variance requests less frequent and more public, I will publish them along with the outcome on this blog. 




BZA Results


4/5/2018
METROPOLITAN BOARD OF ZONING APPEALS
P O BOX 196300
METRO OFFICE BUILDING
NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 37219-6300

9 sidewalk variance requested, 6 GRANTED (these are not good odds for sidewalks...)





 

CASE 2018-053 (Council District – 15)


1.  Michael and Karen Angarole, appellants and owners of the property located at 2124 Wooddale Lane, requesting a variance from sidewalk requirements in the R15 District, to construct single family residence. Use-Single Family

RESULT –Deferred Indefinitely


CASE 2018-063 (Council District – 18)


2.  Dewey Engineering, appellant and ALL SEVENS, LLC, owner of the property located at 2909 12th Avenue S, requesting a variance from sidewalk requirements in the OR20 District, to construct a yoga studioUse-sidewalk, commercial building - Yoga studio 
RESULT-Granted with Conditions, granted with the condition that the applicant follows the alternative sidewalk designs approved by Planning.

CASE 2018-075 (Council District – 15)

3. Williams Fine Violin, appellant and Dustin & Nancy Williams, owners of the property located at 204 Donelson Pike, requesting a variance from sidewalk requirements, to be allowed to pay into the sidewalk fund in lieu of construction.  Use-Sidewalk 
RESULT-Granted

CASE 2018-083 (Council District – 06)

4. Duane Cuthbertson, appellant and Magness Devco 2, owner of the property located at 1400 Ordway Place, requesting a variance from sidewalk requirements in the R6 District, to construct a single family residence. Use-Single Family Residential
RESULT-Granted

CASE 2018-094 (Council District – 05)

5. Marsalias Teague, appellant and GREMADA INDUSTRIES, INC., owner of the property located at 20a and 20b Fern Ave, requesting a variance from sidewalk requirements in the RM20-A District, to construct a new single family residence. Use-Duplex RESULT-Granted, appellant must dedicate right of way along the property frontage but does not have to pay the in-lieu fee



CASE 2018-097 (Council District – 21)


6.  Jorge Lopez, appellant and 1808 Pearl Street Partners, owner of the property located at 1806 & 1808 Pearl St., requesting a variance from sidewalk requirements in the R6 District to construct duplex. Use-Duplex
RESULT-Granted



CASE 2018-099 (Council District – 05)


7.  Jeri Howard, appellant and owner of the property located at 147 A&B Elmhurst Ave, requesting variances from front setback and sidewalk requirements in the R6-A District, to construct a new residence. Use-Duplex
RESULT-Deferred May 3, 2018
 

CASE 2018-102 (Council District – 32)


8.  Bradley Bork, appellant and Kimbro Family Properties, owner of the property located at 5272 Cane Ridge Road, requesting a variance for alternative sidewalk construction in the SCR District, to construct a 424 sq ft expansion to an existing conveinience store.  Use-Convenience Store
RESULT-Granted


CASE 2018-107 (Council District – 33)


9.  Brett Garrett, appellant and CH REALTY, owner of the property located at 3818 Logistics Way, requesting a variance from sidewalk in the IR District, to build a warehouse.  Use-Warehouse 
RESULT –Deferred 5/17/18

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3/15/2018 - 14 sidewalk variances requested, 10/14 granted (THIS IS NOT A GOOD TREND!)


3/1/2018 - 4 sidewalk variances requests, all 4 granted

1. CASE 2018-020 (Council District – 17)  -
Gary Wisniewski, appellant and O.I.C 1001 Summit Avenue, owner of the property located at 1001 C Summit Avenue, requesting a variance from sidewalk requirements in the District, to construct two single family residences, without construction of updated sidewalk.

RESULT-Denied


2. CASE 2018-036 (Council District – 33) -
Gary Bull, appellant and Tandem Investments, LLC, owner of the property located at 1436 Heil Quaker Blvd., requesting variance from sidewalk requirements, but not eligible to pay into the sidewalk fund in the IR District, to construct a new warehouse.


RESULT-Granted
3. CASE 2018-038 (Council District – 20) Joshua Bronleewe, appellant and Joshua Bronleewe, owner of the property located at 905 47th Avenue North, requesting variance from sidewalk requirements in the R6 District, to construct a single family residence.
RESULT –Granted, subject to the following conditions: The variance is granted for the portion of the frontage on 47th Avenue from the alley on the north end of the lot, down to the third of the three large trees along 47th Avenue. The variance is denied on the remaining frontage of the property.

4. CASE 2018-039 (Council District – 6) Vincent Morelli, appellant and Pantheon Development, LLC, owner of the property located at 114 Lindsley Park Dr., requesting variance from sidewalk requirements, requesting not to construct or contribute into the sidewalk fund in the R6 District, to construct two single family residences.
RESULT-Denied
5. CASE 2018-042 (Council District – 21) Chad Robbins, appellant and Bemsee, LLC, owner of the property located at 503 Spruce Street, requesting a variance from sidewalk requirements in the OR20 District, to construct a 1629 square foot second floor addition.
RESULT-Granted
6. CASE 2018-048 (Council District – 15)
Josh Randolph, appellant and Josh Randolph, owner of the property located at 294 B Mc Gavock Pike, requesting variance from sidewalk requirements in the R20 District, to construct a second unit of a duplex.
RESULT-Granted

7.CASE 2018-053 (Council District – 15)
Michael and Karen Angarole, appellants and owners of the property located at 2124 Wooddale Lane, requesting variance from sidewalk requirements in the R15 District, to construct single family residence.
RESULT-Deferred 8. CASE 2018-055 (Council District – 16)
Mike Donoho, appellant and International Church of foursquare gospel, owner of the property located at 2949 Nolensville Pike, requesting a variance from sidewalk requirements in the CS District, to rehab an office building.
RESULT-Granted





9. CASE 2018-056 (Council District – 05)
Invent Communities, appellant and Invent Communities, owner of the property located at 908 Lischey Ave, requesting a variance from sidewalk requirements in the SP District, to allow construction of townhomes.
RESULT-Granted





10. CASE 2018-059 (Council District – 19)
Willow Street Partners, appellant and owner of the property located at 65 Willow Street, requesting a variance from sidewalk requirements in the OV-UZO, IR District, to construct a 4,000 square foot warehouse.
RESULT-Granted




11. CASE 2018-060 (Council District – 22)
Brendan Boles, appellant and Michael D. Shmerling Partners, owner of the property located at 7025 Charlotte Pike, requesting a variance from sidewalk requirements in the R40 District, for multifamily construction.
RESULT-Granted - The development will be behind Brookmeade School on a busy stretch of Charlotte










12. CASE 2018-062 (Council District – 20)
Jeff Parnell, appellant and Brian Chandler, owner of the property located at 525 Basswood Avenue, requesting a variance from sidewalk requirements in the IWD District, for proposed boat storage facility.
RESULT-Granted




13. CASE 2018-063 (Council District – 18)
Dewey Engineering, appellant and All Sevens, LLC, owner of the property located at 2909 12th Ave. S, requesting a variance from sidewalk requirements in the OR20 District, to construct a yoga studio.
RESULT-Deferred April 5, 2018




14. CASE 2018-064 (Council District – 24)
Dewey Engineering, appellant and EBO PROPERTIES, GP, owner of the property located at 3813 ELKINS AVE, requesting a variance from sidewalk requirements in the RS5 District, to construct a single family residence.
RESULT-Granted with Conditions: Granted variance for frontage on Elkins, but required payment into the sidewalk fund for 39th Avenue as indicated in Planning’s recommendations





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It would be helpful to have a map of the sidewalk variances that are granted...is your neighborhood missing out?



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