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Tuesday, July 5, 2016

Don't Block My Walk...Two Unexpected Ways to Make Nashville More Walkable Today



Don't Block My Walk...Two Unexpected Ways to Make Nashville More Walkable Today  

Bear with me a minute as I talk about recycling & composting in Nashville.  You may not think that recycling or composting has anything to do with walkability but I would argue there is a direct link on a few visceral levels.  Walking is about enjoying all your senses - the feel of the breeze, the joy of movement, meeting up with a neighbor.  It should be unencumbered and free.  It should not be about maneuvering around stinking trash cans...

The less trash you make, the less you need to put out your trash buggy.  Trash pick up is weekly but if your bin isn't full & doesn't smell - you don't need to put it out.  Unfortunately, our sidewalks are often blocked by these buggies on a weekly basis - lasting all day and coming with quite an odor.  




In my neighborhood, this is an issue on Natchez Trace. Unfortunately, when the bike lane went in, Public Works did not consider where the trash buggies were to go...Not supposed to be on the sidewalk but also not supposed to be in the bike lane.  Oops!  Poor planning...I met with Public Works over this one.  Before the bike lane, the trash buggies went in the road, hugging the curb.  Now, they are fully blocking the sidewalks.  Public Works said, 'there is no good solution'.  

Well, one good solution would be to reduce the amount of trash we make so that we, as a city, could minimize these obstacles.  




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#DontBlockMyWalk

Recycling pick-up in Nashville is monthly.  If you need an extra recycling buggy, the city will deliver one to you.  You can order a second cart for free by calling (615) 880-1000.


Accepted Materials:

ALL PAPER & BOXES : office paper, magazines, junk mail, newspaper, computer paper, notebook paper, phone books, paperback books, construction paper, brown paper bags, milk or juice cartons (including gable top and aseptic containers), cardboard boxes, food boxes (clean - no food). All boxes should be broken down.
ALL PLASTIC BOTTLES & CONTAINERS: drink bottles and their caps, detergent & cleaner bottles and their caps, yogurt/cottage cheese and other dairy "tubs" and their lids (please empty containers) and plastic trays, such as the lunchable type containers.
ALL METAL & ALUMINUM CANS: empty food and drink cans, empty aerosol cans, foils and trays.
-You can put all items in the cart together - no separation is required.
Recycling collection service is provided to single-family homes in the Urban Services District of Nashville and is collected once a month. Residents must place recyclables in their green roll-out cart. Recyclables are not to be bagged but placed in the cart loosely. For more details on the residential recycling collection program, please read through the frequently asked questions below or call (615) 880-1000.


- In regards to glass - you have to take this separately to a local recycling center
--- For locations for glass recycling -> http://www.nashville.gov/Public-Works/Neighborhood-Services/Recycling/Recycling-Drop-off-Sites.aspx

In addition, as you can imagine, the smell from these trash buggies can be intense.   The city provides compost containers for purchase.  You can drastically reduce the need to take out the trash if you compost as the trash can never becomes fetid.  


Compost Bins Available from Metro Beautification

To encourage backyard composting, Metro Beautification/Public Works has compost bins and supplies available at our Omohundro Convenience Center. 
Omohundro Convenience Center
1019 Omohundro Place, Nashville, TN 37210
Hours: Tues. - Sat., 8:30am - 4:30p.m.
615-880-1955

Payment may be made in cash or by check (payable to Metro Public Works)

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Once, someone said to me, "I don't recycle - couldn't figure it out'.  In 2016, can this be an acceptable reason?


LINK:
http://www.nashville.gov/Public-Works/Neighborhood-Services/Recycling.aspx


Inspiration:
http://www.cnn.com/2016/07/04/us/lauren-singer-zero-waste-blogger-plastic/




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